David Byrne is having an amazing summer. First he unveils “Playing the Building,” an art installation where he rigged an old maritime building near Manhattan’s seaport with sound creating devices linked to a prepared keyboard. Then he designs and installs a number of creative bike racks around New York City that function as a love letter to New York’s life and history. And now this, a new collaborative album with Brian Eno, the master composer who produced some of the Talking Heads’ best albums and worked with Byrne to create the wonderful experimental pop album “My Life In The Bush Of Ghosts” in 1981. The new album, called “Everything That Happens Will Happen Today,” is available directly from David’s website, and features a collection of pop songs that were written by Byrne and Eno from across the Atlantic Ocean. Critics like to call Eno’s music “sonic landscapes,” a term that’s frequenty associated with Eno for his “ambient” compositions (some say he invented the genre, with “Music for Airports” being a personal favorite). The term is being stretched ever so slightly in this context. The new songs don’t live on a sprawling foundation of slightly changing contours. They are straight up pop set over lush and extraordinarily balanced instrumentation and production that will no doubt please the millions of listeners familiar with U2’s “All That You Can’t Leave Behind.” “Everything That Happens Will Happen Today” contains some of Byrne’s best writing to date. This song, “Life Is Long,” a soaring gospel rock prayer, puts Byrne in strange but familiar territory, a soaring prayer with an arch sensibility that finds Byrne about as happy as ever. It’s a song about second chances, perhaps a self-reflexive comment on the thrill he must feel to be working with his pal Eno once again. You can buy his album digitally for about $9 from his website, or pay a few bucks extra to have the CD shipped to you when it’s physically released in November.

August 20, 2008

David Byrne is having an amazing summer. First he unveils “Playing the Building,” an art installation where he rigged an old maritime building near Manhattan’s seaport with sound creating devices linked to a prepared keyboard. Then he designs and installs a number of creative bike racks around New York City that function as a love letter to New York’s life and history. And now this, a new collaborative album with Brian Eno, the master composer who produced some of the Talking Heads’ best albums and worked with Byrne to create the wonderful experimental pop album “My Life In The Bush Of Ghosts” in 1981.

The new album, called “Everything That Happens Will Happen Today,” is available directly from David’s website, and features a collection of pop songs that were written by Byrne and Eno from across the Atlantic Ocean. Critics like to call Eno’s music “sonic landscapes,” a term that’s frequenty associated with Eno for his “ambient” compositions (some say he invented the genre, with “Music for Airports” being a personal favorite). The term is being stretched ever so slightly in this context. The new songs don’t live on a sprawling foundation of slightly changing contours. They are straight up pop set over lush and extraordinarily balanced instrumentation and production that will no doubt please the millions of listeners familiar with U2’s “All That You Can’t Leave Behind.”

“Everything That Happens Will Happen Today” contains some of Byrne’s best writing to date. This song, “Life Is Long,” a soaring gospel rock prayer, puts Byrne in strange but familiar territory, a soaring prayer with an arch sensibility that finds Byrne about as happy as ever. It’s a song about second chances, perhaps a self-reflexive comment on the thrill he must feel to be working with his pal Eno once again.

You can buy his album digitally for about $9 from his website, or pay a few bucks extra to have the CD shipped to you when it’s physically released in November.

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